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Psycholinguistics of interaction

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In an overview of the cognitive foundations of the interaction hypothesis, Ellis brings together a number of authors and theories or models which are referenced in the present learning resource.

Can you fit each correctly into the text?
 

Language acquisition as the learning of form-function mappings


(1) _______________ (1916) proposed that language comprises linguistic signs, the signifiers of linguistic form and their associated signifieds, the functions, concepts or meanings. In such a view language acquisition is the learning of mappings between form and function, and can be accordingly investigated following domain-general approaches to human learning:

Associative [the types of learning first analyzed within the (2) _______________ Tradition of the 1950s, e.g. for L1 Skinner (1957), for L2 (3) _______________  (1964)],

(4) _______________  [the wider range of learning processes studied within Cognitive Psychology of the 1970s, including more conscious, explicit, deductive, or tutored processes, e.g. for L1 Slobin (1992), for L2 McLaughlin (1987), Andersen (1993)], and

Connectionist [the patterns and associations that emerge from the statistical regularities in the summed experience of form-meaning patterns, as explored in the (5) _______________ and Competition Model studies of the 1980s and 1990s, e.g. for L1 Elman (1990; Elman et al., 1996), for L2 MacWhinney(1987a,1987b), Ellis & Schmidt (1998)].

 

Lado          Saussure        behaviorist          cognitive       Parallel Distributed Processing

 

ANSWERS

Language acquisition as the learning of form-function mappings

1. Saussure (1916) proposed that language comprises linguistic signs, the signifiers of linguistic form and their associated signifieds, the functions, concepts or meanings. In such a view language acquisition is the learning of mappings between form and function, and can be accordingly investigated following domain-general approaches to human learning: Associative [the types of learning first analyzed within the 2. Behaviorist Tradition of the 1950s, e.g. for L1 Skinner (1957), for L2 3. Lado (1964)], 4. Cognitive [the wider range of learning processes studied within Cognitive Psychology of the 1970s, including more conscious, explicit, deductive, or tutored processes, e.g. for L1 Slobin (1992), for L2 McLaughlin (1987), Andersen (1993)], and Connectionist [the patterns and associations that emerge from the statistical regularities in the summed experience of form-meaning patterns, as explored in the 5. Parallel Distributed Processing and Competition Model studies of the 1980s and 1990s, e.g. for L1 Elman (1990; Elman et al., 1996), for L2 MacWhinney(1987a,1987b), Ellis & Schmidt (1998)].


Ellis, N. C.. (2008). The Psycholinguistics of the Interaction Hypothesis. In A. Mackey and C. Polio (Eds.), Multiple Perspectives on Interaction in SLA: Second language research in Honor of Susan M. Gass. ( pp. 11-40). New York: Routledge.

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